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Cards Against Creativity

by • 9 Jan, 2017 • Inspiration, WorkshopsComments (1)3101

From the archives: Cards Against Creativity (Download!)

Last June, together with Don Undeen and the Creative Museum project, I developed a one-off game inspired by Cards Against Humanity. Cards Against Creativity was designed to start conversations during a workshop about creativity in museums, and to generate new ideas for projects, exhibitions, etc.

If you’ve ever played Cards Against Humanity, you know the gameplay is super easy: One player asks a fill-in-the-blank question or poses a statement, and the other players respond with pre-filled cards with answers. Best (funniest, most appropriate, etc.) answer wins. For the Creative Museum event we remixed the format a little bit, to help participants take ideas from one workshop to the next, remix ideas from different speakers, interact with each other and create a quick summary at the end of the event.

The approach worked really well to add a new dimension to the event, and create an open and creative atmosphere among participants. Feel free to download the source files if you’d like to play this game at your next event (or simply to have a look).

The way we used the cards, was play new rounds of the game at every presentation or workshop, and link the questions (black cards) to the content of each element. At the start of the event participants received both blank and pre-filled answer cards (white), which they could play whenever they wanted to. The blank cards were filled with content specific answers, which would then create accidental connections when played in another context. We planned it that the blank cards would run out halfway through the event, to challenge participants to make connections between different parts of the event.

The Cards Against Humanity gameplay made it possible one participant’s answer to a question after the opening keynote can become another participant’s best idea as input for a later workshop. At the end of the event, during the drinks, participants could use the cards they had collected throughout the event to answer some overarching questions, part funny, part serious.

I’d definitely play a version of this game again if the opportunity arises. Let me know if you need help making it work for you.

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